Jennifer Larson's picture
By Jennifer Larson

Misting Magic

7 ways to scrapbook with spray mists
eZine image: 

One of the hottest trends in scrapbooking this year has been misting. Many companies are coming out with spray mists in varied colors and lustres: Tattered Angels, Maya Road, Studio Calico, October Afternoon, Smooch, and others. Since they look so cool and can be used so many different ways, I’ve been temptedto try them.

My problem? I’m a tidy scrapper. I like to plan and put things exactly where they should go. Mist? It’s hard to be precise with that. Still, the look is so enticing that I decided to challenge myself this year: how could I use mist and be true to my scrapping self? How could I be a “tidy mister”? (Meaning, of course, a person who applies mist tidily, rather than a gentleman who is well organized.)
 

Supplies:

cardstock (Bazzill) • patterned paper (Crate Paper) • spray mist (Studio Calico, Maya Mist) • stickers (Crate Paper, October Afternoon, KI Memories) • punches (EK Success) • buttons (Stampin’ Up!) • stamp (Studio Calico) • ink (Stampin’ Up!) • floss (DMC) • pen (Zig) • thread • 12 x 12 layout by Jennifer Larson
Tip: I tried to mimic the colors of the tie die. To do so, I used multiple colors. Whenever I do, I always start with the lighter colors and mist a lot, then mist more lightly and indirectly with the darker colors. 

Click image for larger view

After much practice and trial-and-error, I discovered some of techniques that allow me to be more meticulous with misting. Here’s what I do:

Contain the mess. I mist in a box (not with a fox, like Dr. Seuss, just in a box). You can buy special mist boxes in stores or online, but I just use a box some of my scrapbook supplies arrived in from an online store.

Control the coverage. The way you hold the bottle will affect the coverage. Here are some suggestions:

  • Holding the bottle so your hand is perpendicular to the paper results in a fine mist. I use this technique with darker colors.
  • Holding the bottle at a 45-degree angle allows more coverage, without becoming too intense. I do most misting on background paper this way.
  • Holding the bottle so it’s pointing straight down (hand parallel to the paper) results in fuller coverage. I use this angle when I’m colorizing something like letters or flowers completely.


Focus the spray. I do four main things to keep the color where I want it.

Supplies:

patterned paper (Scenic Route, My Mind’s Eye) • spray mist (Maya Mist) • stickers (Making Memories, American Crafts, October Afternoon) • die cut (My Mind’s Eye, Stampin’ Up!) • flowers (Prima) • buttons (Stampin’ Up!) • floss (DMC, Karen Foster) • stitching template (Bazzill) • pearls (Prima) • pen (Zig) • photo corners • 12 x 12 layout by Jennifer Larson

 

Click image for larger view

1. I spray objects before I place them on the page. This is the easiest way to keep mist from getting too messy. True, you can achieve the same effect with paint, but the coverage is more even and the process is quicker with mist. Here, I misted the fabric-covered letters. Anything with a porous surface (not acrylic or buttons) will soak in the mist.
 

Supplies:

patterned paper (Crate Paper, My Mind’s Eye, Pink Paislee, Graphic 45) • spray mist (Studio Calico, Tattered Angels) • stickers (Adornit, American Crafts) • die cut (My Mind’s Eye) • template (The Crafter’s Workshop) • wood letters (Studio Calico) • flowers (Prima) • linen thread (Stampin’ Up!) • fibers (Maya Road) • thread • date stamp • 12 x 12 spread by Jennifer Larson

 

Click image for larger view

2. I spray using a template. On this layout, I used one of the hot new templates from Crafter’s Workshop. I didn’t want the whole design from the template on my page, so I covered the less-desired images with wax paper while I misted. This repelled some mist while still adding a fun, creative design to my background.
 

Supplies:

cardstock (Bazzill) • patterned paper (October Afternoon, We R Memory Keepers, Crate Paper) • spray mist (Maya Mist) • stickers (October Afternoon, American Crafts) • ribbon (Creative Cafe) • chipboard flower (Jenni Bowlin)• pen (Zig) • button • 12 x 12 layout by Jennifer Larson

Click image for larger view

3. You can also mask using a variety of items. Here I used a chipboard flower to leave the unmisted space empty; I then journaled inside the unmisted flower shape to make it stand out more.
 

Supplies:

patterned paper (Crate Paper, Basic Grey, Studio Calico) • spray mist (Studio Calico) • stickers (Crate Paper, Jenni Bowlin) • punches (EK Success) • die cuts (Crate Paper) • glitter frame (Making Memories) • tape (American Crafts) • gems (Mark Richards) • stamp, chipboard word (Maya Road) • ink (Stampin’ Up!) • floss (DMC) • actions (Pioneer Woman Boost) • thread • date stamp • brads • 12 x 12 spread by Jennifer Larson

Click image for larger view

4. I unscrew the spray tip and drip it onto the page. On this layout I used a white mist to spray, then I dripped blops of white ink onto the page to simulate snow.


Bonus Idea: Misted journaling spots

Supplies:

cardstock (Bazzill) • Patterned paper (Studio Calico, Cosmo Cricket) • brads (Crate Paper, Pink Paislee) • flash card (Elle's Studio) • button (Jenni Bowlin) • stickers (Crate Paper, Studio Calico) • kraft envelope (Maya Road) • mist (Studio Calico) • 12 x 12 layout by Jenni Hufford

Click image for larger view

Jenni Hufford used green spray mist to create a visual triangle on her layout that connects each spot of journaling. “When creating a layout, I often leave the journaling portion for last,” Jenni says. “It's not because I have nothing to say (actually, it’s quite the opposite), I just have a difficult time envisioning where the journaling will be when it comes to design.”



One fun way to incorporate journaling into design is to use misting.  Yes misting! For this layout, Jenni didn’t leave any space for journaling in her column of photos and accents.   So misted her background cardstock in three spots and added her words on top—a very natural look that blends nicely with the rest of her design.


Bonus Idea: Misting with acrylic-stamp masks

Supplies:

patterned paper (Pink Paislee) • dimensional stickers (Basic Grey) • acrylic stamp (Glitz Designs) • mist (Glimmer Mist) • letter stickers (Glitz Designs) • vintage book page • Opportunity Knocks playing card • tissue houndstooth paper • plastic flower • 12 x 12 layout by Francine Clouden

Click image for larger view

Francine Clouden used spray mist and an acrylic stamps to fashion an innovative dress-form accent that appears to be part of her background cardstock. Then she decorated over and around it to complete the look.



Here’s how:
1. Place the acrylic stamp facedown (without mounting block) where you want it on the page.
2. Spray lightly over stamp with the mist
3. Remove stamp.
4. Once the ink is dry you can then stamp the image in the blank spot (in a contrasting color) if desired.
Tip: Use acrylic stamps that are cut pretty close to the image, for a clearer impression.
 
Many thanks to Jenni and Francine for sharing how they mist. I hope you all get a chance to pick up a bottle or two and have a good time playing with color. Don’t let a little mess hold you back—embrace that inner mister!

Bonus Note: Mister Maintenance
My spray bottles can clog up after a period of inactivity. How do you unclog them? I got this advice from my local scrapbook store: soak the spray tip in very hot water. It make take a few bowls of hot water (especially if you use a glimmer mist with mica chips in it), but you will unclog the sprayer and be able to mist again with ease!



Looking for more misted magic? Check out Eight is Enough: Easy ways to stretch supplies and use leftovers, by April Foster and Studio Calico, where Maya Mist makes a prominent appearance on several layouts.

Your rating: None Average: 4.9 (98 votes)